Should We Free The Canon Webinar?

Posted by: Bruce Nussbaum on November 26, 2007

I’m caught in a fascinating conunrum. Well, actually Canon is caught in a conundrum. I did a great video webinar before Thanksgiving with three pioneers in social networking—Joe Robinson of A Small World, Danphne Kwon of ExpoTV and Douglas Atkins of MeetUp.com. Canon sponsored it and you had to register to plug in.

That’s cool. Lots of people registered, many watched it live and many more watched it later over the weekend. People are still registering and plugging in.

But should we, as David Armano, suggests, “free” the video and let it roam over the blogosphere and web? All it would take would be to make the code available, right? And wouldn’t Canon benefit if thousands of people had quick access to the thoughts and discussion of a very smart panel on social media?

Well, yes, but… The counter-argument is that Canon supported the video webinar and deserves the information it is getting about the people registering to watch it. And without additional branding, Canon only gets a brief mention in my introductory remarks to the discussion.

As an open-source kind of guy, my own sense is to open up the video to the web—and provide Canon with the kind of recognition it deserves to sponsor such a great trio of social media greats who have fascinating things to say. Spread the word.

What do you think?

Reader Comments

Crawford

November 26, 2007 4:48 PM

Add a kind and short Canon logo splash at the beginning and set that sucker free!

Todd W.

November 26, 2007 5:05 PM

"Canon supported the video webinar and deserves the information it is getting about the people registering to watch it."

Well, those registrations are going to be of limited value as "leads" since many (most?) people are just signing up to get access, not because they are interested in receiving communications from Canon or buying an office printer.

In fact, it's a questionable sponsorship decision since I'd think those people most responsible for making corporate printer purchase decisions (or even influencing such decisions) are not the same audience for a panel on social media.

David Armano

November 27, 2007 7:09 PM

Getting people's e-mail addresses in this was, as stated by Todd doesn't guarantee quality information and many people I know provide false information anyway. It's a subtle way to give the middle finger if you feel like the content shouldn't require "registration".

There are may ways that Canon can brand and syndicate the content if they want to. As suggested, they can include an intro similar to the Ted videos and like Ted, they can brand the video player itself while providing links back to their source.

Distribution ensures more eyeballs and is a better experience. But, I guess if you want to continue to ask users to register—then it's your party, but in my opinion a missed opportunity.

PS, I still haven't watched the video. I didn't have time to register. I guess I'm spoiled by a world of instant gratification. :-)

PS, re-design of blog looks good.

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Want to stop talking about innovation and learn how to make it work for you? Bruce Nussbaum takes you deep into the latest thinking about innovation and design with daily scoops, provocative perspectives and case studies. Nussbaum is at the center of a global conversation on the growing discipline of innovation and the deepening field of design thinking. Read him to discover what social networking works—and what doesn’t. Discover where service innovation is going and how experience design is shaping up. Learn which schools are graduating the most creative talent and which consulting firms are the hottest. And get his take on what the smartest companies are doing in the U.S., Asia and Europe, far ahead of the pack.

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