Motorola's New RAZR2

Posted by: Bruce Nussbaum on May 16, 2007

Motorola has launched a new slew up updated cell phones and boy, are they snazzy. They hit the market in July, a month after the Apple touch-screen iPhone goes on sale. I’m a big fan of Motorola since the days when I loved my StarTac and wish the company well in this launch.

But Motorola’s CEO Ed Zander—a man who deeply understands what design and innovation is all about—needs to go beyond fashion to experience to bring back the brand after the recent drop in profits and market share.

Bottom line, the RAZR2 has to deliver a better consumer experience than the miserable consumer experience of the original RAZR. It just has to do that. I think Motorola still has the loyalty of most of its customers, even those many feel cheated and angered by their experience with RAZR. They probably will give Motorola another chance—but only one. RAZR2 has to have a better user interface built on a more up-to-date software platform.

From what I read, it may. Fashion can catch your eye, but you have to deliver the experience.

Reader Comments

Andrew

May 16, 2007 6:14 PM

Bruce:
one of the points you forgot to address in your last post on the Razr is its poor reliability. I agree that the user interface on the current razr is total junk, but the phone is also notoriously unreliable. I have friends that have gone through 5 razrs a piece all replaced under warranty. The razr was a great looking phone, but everything else about it sucked. If motorolla wants to keep customers they need to make a phone that is more durable, in addition to better software and user experience.

Jay

May 17, 2007 6:09 AM

Have had my razr for about a year, still the same one still in good condition, people just need to learn to take care of there phones...

Anirban Mukerji

May 17, 2007 8:14 AM

Not only are motorola phones unreliable, the service is also very bad. I own a Motorola A 768i and within a year the flip top went bad. The Service centre never responded to phones, and despite many reminders they did not fit an original motorola spare. After 4 months the phone keeps shutting down on its own and it has become completely unusable. I just junked the phone and bought myself a nokia

shahram

May 17, 2007 2:19 PM

Long time ago i had Motorola and it was piece of junk. I never back to Motorola since they just after look and feel of the phone. The software and user interface is always terrible and as well as customer service. I own LG now for past three years and it is great

Damon

May 17, 2007 8:32 PM

Motorola phone's (in my experience and I have had many of them over the years) suffer from firmware bugs and small, but significant, oversights in the UI. I have to agree that they have great physical design. Motorola has not been forthcomming in releasing bug fixes for these phones either.

Alec

May 18, 2007 8:52 PM

Motorola can make all the snazzy-looking phones they want, but I'm not buying them until they achieve the one thing I want in a phone- reliability. I have experienced an incredible improvement in the quality of the signal I recieve everywhere since I dumped Motorola and got an LG. Maybe my phone won't turn heads, but it will make and recieve calls everywhere I go. Now that's good design.

zack

September 21, 2007 3:30 AM

razr v3 - i think the life expectancy is an year. they have a go bad after warranty chip in them - they still look cute and cuddly - both bitchs i got - no worky. one keeps shutting down. the other's key pad is locked up. i can tell the key pad is not hardware related. it is a software feature.

Matt

July 22, 2008 7:17 PM

I have a razr2 v8 on t-mobile I have had the phone for about six months and i already have had to have it replaced twice already also the Razr2 shows every little fingerprint on it.

Post a comment

 

About

Want to stop talking about innovation and learn how to make it work for you? Bruce Nussbaum takes you deep into the latest thinking about innovation and design with daily scoops, provocative perspectives and case studies. Nussbaum is at the center of a global conversation on the growing discipline of innovation and the deepening field of design thinking. Read him to discover what social networking works—and what doesn’t. Discover where service innovation is going and how experience design is shaping up. Learn which schools are graduating the most creative talent and which consulting firms are the hottest. And get his take on what the smartest companies are doing in the U.S., Asia and Europe, far ahead of the pack.

BW Mall - Sponsored Links

Buy a link now!