Managing Temporary Workers

Posted by: Patricia O'Connell on January 11, 2010

Recently met with Joanie Ruge, Senior Vice-President of Adecco, “The world leader in workforce solutions.” As such, one of the company’s main businesses is providing temporary workers. It’s no surprise that cautious, cash-strapped companies are looking more and more to temps to fill jobs at more senior levels and in professional capacities. Ruge offered some thoughts on managing temp workers:

--Make the project as specific as possible.
--Communicate the details about your expectations to the person filling that role.
--Manage the project closely. That doesn't mean micromanaging, but making sure you'll get what you need from the person.
--Recognize that even though there is a lot of talent on the market, for many of the people filling the more senior, professional roles, they still have choices and needed to be treated accordingly.

Reader Comments

Interconnect

January 11, 2010 11:01 PM

Joanne Ruge could you please tell your presence in the BRICS countries as for example China for temporary workers. Is outsourcing for HR done for temporary workers from BRICS countries as Brazil, Russia, India, China, block and SAARC block countries. Is outsourcing done for temporary workers for employment of BRICS HR in the US, Europe. Is the quality of temporary workers assured worldwide, regardless or their origin.
Email: haroon@supertec.com

Fred

January 12, 2010 10:12 AM

Useless article.

Society cannot function when all workers are disposable.

Jim T.

January 12, 2010 11:26 AM

Fred, it's just the opposite.

Our free enterprise society has soared BECAUSE no worker is indispensable.

Good managers manage assuming any worker could be unavailable at any time.

Having worked as a fulltime dedicated W2 employee of a failed fortune 500 named Westinghouse, I'm elated to be a "disposable", "temporary" worker. Hour worked, hour paid. Insurance, vacation, sick time, etc. is on me and that's the way I want it.

It's too much to ask the simple humans that are running companies to be responsible not only for keeping the business humming, but also, to be my caregiver.

I want these humans to focus solely on keeping the business running, period. I'll take care of myself.

That's the attitude the framers of our fine country wanted us to have. If I were inclined toward being taken care of by my employer or government, I would relocate to Europe.

Individual ruggedism is the goal.

Fred

January 13, 2010 8:43 AM

Jim, your argument is based on false premises and questionable values.

First, that it is of net benefit to society when business is free to operate with complete disregard for the welfare and economic stability of its workers. Conversely, given complete freedom, that businesses will make conscientious decisions with respect to their workers that, in the end, are of overall social and economic benefit.

Second, that it is reasonable to expect so-called simple humans, rugged individualists, to possess the means and the wherewithal to shoulder the burden of risk competing against multinational business interests in a global labor marketplace. That it is efficient and fair and sane, in an increasingly fast-changing and specialized workplace, for individual workers to be preoccupied with this risk on a daily basis. That the labor market is sufficiently fluid, skills sufficiently transferable, workers sufficiently adaptable, to keep your vision of society from leading to social disruption and ultimately poverty and chaos.

Third, that socially responsible business practices somehow undermine your freedom as an individual worker to care for yourself and to make employment decisions according to your self interest.

Fourth, that the notion of freedom envisioned by the Founding Fathers and embodied in our constitution and system of government necessitates the separation of individual rights and responsibilities from those of the collective. That it is economically and morally inappropriate, contrary to individual and social welfare, to demand of individuals to think and act with ample regard for the greater good. That by ceding so much economic and political power to the hands of corporations (and therefore politicians) that we are creating a situation that is any less objectionable than the abuses that led to the American revolution in the first place.

Fifth, that compassion is bad.

Sixth, that corporate greed will not throw the economy under the bus. That "faith-based charities" and the like will pick up the slack when ordinary people find themselves in desperate need.

Finally, that we are a better, stronger, happier, healthier, more creative, more vibrant, more productive society when all we think about is damned business and making a buck.

In short, I find your libertarian attitude to be impractical, irresponsible, and reactionary. I don't believe it, it makes no sense, it's contrary to human nature, and current events prove just how wrong you are.

Possibly, you are an Übermensch. I commend you for your exceptional self-reliance and wish you the best of luck building your Randian utopia. Just remember that "Atlas Shrugged" was fiction.

Tushar Khosla

January 24, 2010 11:28 AM

Offcourse no Corporation can run business by employing temperory workers/managers in critical positions or focul jobs. Where they may actually make sense is specific requirement to test pilot or scale-up operations, in which case having clear exit date actually help temperory.

When forced to engage senior managers/professionals, besides ensuring the clearity of responsibilities and expected outcomes, it is also important to share the details of decision making process and specifics about culture like degree of formalisation in communication or inclusiveness in decision making.

Reflect!!!

Tushar Khosla

January 24, 2010 11:28 AM

Offcourse no Corporation can run business by employing temperory workers/managers in critical positions or focul jobs. Where they may actually make sense is specific requirement to test pilot or scale-up operations, in which case having clear exit date actually help temperory.

When forced to engage senior managers/professionals, besides ensuring the clearity of responsibilities and expected outcomes, it is also important to share the details of decision making process and specifics about culture like degree of formalisation in communication or inclusiveness in decision making.

Reflect!!!

Tushar Khosla

January 24, 2010 11:28 AM

Offcourse no Corporation can run business by employing temperory workers/managers in critical positions or focul jobs. Where they may actually make sense is specific requirement to test pilot or scale-up operations, in which case having clear exit date actually help temperory.

When forced to engage senior managers/professionals, besides ensuring the clearity of responsibilities and expected outcomes, it is also important to share the details of decision making process and specifics about culture like degree of formalisation in communication or inclusiveness in decision making.

Reflect!!!

Tushar Khosla

January 24, 2010 11:30 AM

Offcourse no Corporation can run business by employing temporary workers/managers in critical positions or focul jobs. Where they may actually make sense is specific requirement to test pilot or scale-up operations, in which case having clear exit date actually help temporary.

When forced to engage senior managers/professionals, besides ensuring the clarity of responsibilities and expected outcomes, it is also important to share the details of decision making process and specifics about culture like degree of formalization in communication or inclusiveness in decision making.

Reflect!!!

OXYGEN

March 28, 2010 9:25 AM

Offcourse no Corporation can run business by employing temperory workers/managers in critical positions or focul jobs. Where they may actually make sense is specific requirement to test pilot or scale-up operations, in which case having clear exit date actually help temperory.

When forced to engage senior managers/professionals, besides ensuring the clearity of responsibilities and expected outcomes, it is also important to share the details of decision making process and specifics about culture like degree of formalisation in communication or inclusiveness in decision making.

Reflect!!!

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