Young Exec Looking for Adventure? Tough Luck

Posted by: Diane Brady on June 17, 2009

As further evidence that leaders are nervous, multinational companies are planning to send fewer employees on global assignments this year. According to an annual survey of 180 corporations by Brookfield Global Relocation Services, more than two-thirds said they will decrease or, at most, maintain expatriate levels.

Interestingly, those that do relocate employees are increasingly turning to older and more experienced workers. Only 9% of expatriates in surveyed companies were 20 to 29 years old — the lowest in the survey’s 14-year history. The number of female expats is also down to 20%, from 23% a few years ago. And 49% of expats were accompanied by children (the historical average is 57%). Picking older workers with grown children eliminates at least one of the major concerns in relocation: finding decent schools.

One troubling issue emerges from the study. If companies are reducing expenses for international assignments in response to the current climate—as 68% said they would—how are they going to prepare the next generation for global leadership?

Reader Comments

Thomas Huynh

June 18, 2009 12:49 PM

Hi Diane,

They aren't. Like the government, businesses seem to be thinking short-term. The reason is clear and reasonable: to get them through the recession. The question is will they continue to act this way long-term, and if they're saying/feeling the recession might continue on for some time, then there's definitely a concern here. Thus your question is an important question companies need to ask themselves. Thomas

Thomas Huynh

June 18, 2009 12:50 PM

Hi Diane,

They aren't. Like the government, businesses seem to be thinking short-term. The reason is clear and reasonable: to get them through the recession. The question is will they continue to act this way long-term, and if they're saying/feeling the recession might continue on for some time, then there's definitely a concern here. Thus your question is an important question companies need to ask themselves. Thomas

Dan Rubin

July 18, 2009 6:42 AM

I was in the IT industry for more than 10 years, and I enjoy programming. After using the software outsourcing service of a software company in HK, I shift my focus to the finance field. They are very good at understanding and anticipating problems. I immediately favored software development outsourcing. It offered everything we needed: it’s stable, well-regarded, actively maintained, and the product’s open architecture meant that support costs were likely to be more reasonable.

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