Deloitte shows off its consulting bona fides

Posted by: Jena McGregor on August 27, 2007

Attention fans of consultant-speak “thought leadership” best-practice articles (anyone out there?): Yet another firm is joining the publishing ranks.

Today, Deloitte launches its first edition of Deloitte Review, which is available both online and in print. With its consultants authoring recent books such as The Strategy Paradox and Mass Career Customization, the addition of a journal (McKinsey and Booz Allen each have their own) only underscores the firm’s commitment to consulting. My colleage Nanette Byrnes recently chronicled Deloitte’s success with its consulting arm, which it never dumped following the accounting scandals earlier this decade. After Arthur Andersen’s collapse, pressure was on the firms to break up in order to steer clear of audit and consulting conflicts.

As a resource, Deloitte’s journal is pretty much what you’d expect: A few interesting and potentially useful bits of research, a reminder of basic tenets you likely already know, and enough management speak to make even the most hardened veterans of consulting engagements cringe. With a few exceptions, they shy away from naming too many companies to avoid offending clients or potential ones. (An article about corporate culture takes this fear to laughable heights, calling Nordstrom “an upscale department store” when recounting the famous story about the customer who tries to return tires.) As you’d expect, the usual-suspect hot topics are all there, including risk management, merger integration, marketing to Baby Boomers, and strategy. And of course, they’re mostly written by a cadre of consultants who will be happy to step in should the articles not suffice.

Reader Comments

Thomas

August 28, 2007 8:00 PM

Thanks for reminding me about that old tire anecdote. It's like a 1996 email someone (in this case, Deloitte) still forwards to friends even though everyone and his/her mother have seen it.

I reckon the best management stories and lessons are found in small companies since companies with few resources tend to be more creative and efficient. They have to be lest they become extinct.

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