B-Schools

New Programs Widen the Reach of the Business School Ethos


(Corrects fourth paragraph to indicate that Cornell's program is not full-time.)

Business schools constantly churn out new programs to reach wider audiences and bolster their bottom lines. It’s that time of the year when university trustees are signing off on next year’s new program offerings. Here are five examples of B-schools setting their sights on different populations or updating their instruction style, from just the past 48 hours.

Yale Hosts Business Titans
Top business executives holed up at the New York Stock Exchange on Wednesday to swap tips on how to innovate and deal with public scrutiny.

The Yale CEO Summit, in its 70th year, is run by the 25-year-old Chief Executive Leadership Institute at Yale’s School of Management. The institute’s CEO, Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, rang the opening bell before top executives took part in a discussion about “Transforming With Transparency,” the theme of this year’s event.

Another Big China Partnership
Cornell’s Johnson Graduate School of Management will link up with a top Chinese university, Tsinghua, to offer a part-time MBA that teaches Mandarin- and English-speaking students in both languages. The schools said on Wednesday that they will grant an MBA from Cornell and a finance MBA from Tsinghua’s PBC School of Finance to a class of about 65 students who will start next spring. Typically, top business schools connect their executive MBA programs with Chinese universities.

Stanford Courts More Techie Business Leaders
Stanford’s Graduate School of Business is doubling down on offering joint degrees that appeal to tech-savvy business leaders. The university announced on Wednesday that it will allow students to earn an MBA along with a master’s in electrical engineering in three years, instead of the usual four. Students must apply to both the highly selective business and engineering schools to get into the program. The university offered the shorter path to a dual degree last year to students interested in computer science and business.

Bringing in Coaching Help at Oxford
If students at Oxford’s Saïd Business School are lacking confidence or struggling to work in a team, they will be able to enlist the college’s new team of executive coaches to help. The coach offerings—three one-hour sessions a year—are part of the school’s redesigned one-year MBA program, announced on Tuesday. The school will add interdisciplinary modules on responsible leadership, entrepreneurship, and “the global rules of the game” to unite core courses, electives, and outside programs.

Strengthening Border Control
U.S. customs officers are usually charged with picking out people crossing borders illegally and stopping drugs from getting into the country. But about 600 top-level U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents will step inside classrooms at Maryland’s Smith School of Business over the next five years to improve their strategic thinking and business chops. The school announced on Wednesday that it had reached a $7.2 million deal with the federal agency to form the Customs and Border Protection Leadership Institute, a new executive program.

Weinberg is a reporter for Bloomberg Businessweek covering business schools.

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