AP News

Health care law already has had effect in Michigan


Hundreds of thousands of Michigan residents already have benefited from the law passed in 2010, according to the federal government. Some examples:

—More than 23,000 Michigan seniors and people with disabilities have saved $17.6 million this calendar year on prescription drugs because of the law, an average of $757 per person. The money goes to help residents with medical costs after they hit the Medicare Part D prescription drug coverage gap, the so-called "doughnut hole."

—More than a half-million Michigan seniors have received a free preventive health care service so far this year.

—Around 1.8 million residents now receive preventative services with no co-pay.

—Around 57,000 more young adults in Michigan under the age of 26 are on their parents' health insurance plans.

—Around 7,000 small businesses get federal tax credits for offering health insurance to their employees.

—An estimated 500,000 more Michigan residents will qualify for Medicaid coverage, largely children and low-income residents, state officials say. The federal government will pick up most of the additional cost.

—Six Michigan health centers have been awarded $3.7 million from the federal government to help expand access to care for 59,431 additional patients.

—Around 114,000 Michigan residents will get $13.9 million in rebates from insurance companies this summer because of a rule that requires insurance companies give rebates if they don't spend at least 80 percent of consumers' premiums on medical care and quality improvement. The rebates will average $214 for 65,000 Michigan families.


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