BUSINESSWEEK ONLINE : DECEMBER 18, 2000 ISSUE
NEWS: ANALYSIS & COMMENTARY

The Cabinet: How Bush Might Reach Out


George W.'s economic team hardly reflects his promises to make peace with the Democrats and form a Cabinet that reflects the country's diversity. But should he eke out a victory, Bush's noneconomic Cabinet nominees will have to include Democrats--and not just in token positions--if his pledges of bipartisanship are to be believed. In addition, Bush must make good on promises to name women and minorities to significant positions--beyond his expected appointments of General Colin L. Powell as Secretary of State and Condoleezza Rice as National Security Adviser. Among the possibilities:

AFRICAN AMERICANS
Time Warner President Richard D. Parsons, who is slated to be Co-Chief Operating Officer of AOL Time Warner (AOL) once the two companies merge, might be a candidate for Commerce Secretary. This well-respected African American lawyer/manager may be ready to jump ship now that Time Warner CEO Gerald M. Levin has him overseeing the film and music properties of AOL Time Warner--roles that could be overshadowed by co-COO Robert W. Pittman. Parsons is a protege of Nelson Rockefeller and served as an adviser to President Gerald Ford.

DEMOCRATS
Representative Charles W. Stenholm, a conservative ''Blue Dog'' Democrat from Texas, is a leading candidate to run the sprawling Agriculture Dept. Stenholm's fortunes would rise even if he stayed in the House, because he would be a key player under a Bush Administration. And his West Texas seat could well be captured by the GOP in a special election at a time when the Dems are hoping to win a House majority in two more years. Still, Stenholm is telling friends he's sorely tempted to take the post to cap a long career in public service.

RELIGIOUS RIGHT
Lynne Cheney, wife of possible Vice-President Dick Cheney and former Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, is on the short list for Education Secretary. Cheney is a favorite of religious conservatives who want one of their own in a Bush Cabinet. Cheney knows education issues and could be relied on to pacify the Right. But some Bush advisers fear Cheney, who was a polarizing figure during the culture wars of the Reagan Administration, would alienate Hill moderates.

HISPANICS
Texas Railroad Commission member Tony Garza, a Mexican American, is a leading Energy Secretary contender. He now helps oversee the oil and gas industry in Texas and also co-chaired Bush's 2000 National Latino Coalition, an effort to drum up Hispanic votes for the GOP. Garza acted as Bush's liaison to Mexico on border issues. In 1988, he was the first Republican elected to countywide office in south Texas. And as W's former secretary of state, he became an expert on state election law.



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