BUSINESSWEEK ONLINE : FEBRUARY 7, 2000 ISSUE
COVER STORY

For-Profit Charters: A Primer


INNOVATIONS

New or varied curriculums designed to improve student performance

Longer school days and school years

Most don't have teachers' unions, but offer merit pay and stock options

Less spending on administrative and central-office expenses

More parental involvement

Freedom from traditional school bureaucracy


OBSTACLES

Huge capital costs: Unlike public schools, must pay for their own buildings

Political opposition from the education Establishment

Far fewer ''frills,'' such as extracurricular activities

Fewer programs for severely disabled/special-education students

More difficulty attracting experienced teachers

Huge startup costs mean most companies are losing money

DATA: BUSINESS WEEK


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RELATED ITEMS
For-Profit Schools

COVER IMAGE: For-Profit Schools

TABLE: The Business of Education

TABLE: For-Profit Charters: A Primer

ONLINE ORIGINAL: Edison's Chris Whittle: ``Winners of This Race Are Children''

Going to Bat for Vouchers

TABLE: Vouchers: The Tussle Continues

ONLINE ORIGINAL: John Walton: ``Making a World-Class Education Available to Every Child''

ONLINE ORIGINAL: It's Time for a Refresher Course in Education Stocks



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