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THE I-WAY GETS AN EXTRA LANE

TO RELIEVE CYBERJAMS ON THE INTERNET, TELECOM carriers and service providers lay more optic fiber, beef up banks of modems, and install faster network switches. Yet delays continue. That's partly because most organizations store their Web sites and databases on just one computer ''server.'' But Inktomi Corp. in San Mateo, Calif., creator of the HotBot search engine, has a fix that has nothing to do with fatter pipes or faster switches. Its Traffic Server will collect popular Web sites in huge repositories known as network caches.

What distinguishes these cache sites from the ''mirror sites'' already used by companies to alleviate home-page congestion? Each cache will contain broad swathes of the Internet, including information from many companies and Web sites. This massive amount of data--upwards of a trillion bytes--will be stored ''intelligently,'' on the basis of how frequently it is requested. The caches will save money, asserts Inktomi Marketing Vice-President Dick Pierce, ''because it's always cheaper to store a bit of data than to transport it.''

EDITED BY OTIS PORT
Neil Gross


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Updated Oct. 23, 1997 by bwwebmaster
Copyright 1997, Bloomberg L.P.
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