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Austin's Top Entrepreneurs

Michael S. Dell
He's the star of Austin's startup galaxy. As a college student, he began assembling PCs in his dorm room, selling to students and local businesses. Today, his 15% stake in his namesake computer company is worth about $4 billion.

George Kozmetsky
This former University of Texas professor, now a venture capitalist, is Austin's high-tech father. In one way or another, Kozmetsky is linked to most of Austin's big successes, including Dell Computer and Tivoli Systems. As founder of UT's high-tech business incubator, he can claim paternity to some 70 startups.

Joseph A. Liemandt
A second-generation entrepreneur, Liemandt is the son of the founder of Dallas banking software company UCCEL. He and four classmates founded Trilogy Development Group while attending Stanford University in 1989. The privately held company has 500 employees and its programs for configuring and selling complex equipment is used at Xerox, Boeing, and Digital Equipment.

James Truchard
This University of Texas physics researcher and two partners started $200 million National Instruments as a virtual instrument company, using software that converts a PC into instruments such as oscillosopes, waveform generators, and digital multimeters used in electronics testing and production lines.

Robert Fabbio
He's Austin's best-known serial entrepreneur, a cofounder in 1990 of Tivoli Systems, a systems management software company later acquired by IBM; and founder in 1994 of DAZEL Corp., a maker of software for managing document printing. Fabbio is now a venture partner at Austin Ventures.





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